| ©2018 St. John the Evangelist, Sandown

Over   a   hundred   and   twenty   years   ago   an   iron   church   stood   on   this   site   surrounded   by   fields   and   farmland, overlooking   a   much   smaller   town   than   Sandown   is   today.   It   was   erected   when   Christ   Church   -   at   the   other end   of   town   -   proved   too   small   for   the   number   of   people   wanting   to   go   to   church.   Eventually   this   iron church   was   not   large   enough   and   largely   on   the   initiative   of   the   Vicar   at   that   time   (the   Rev   Gilbert   St Karney) work was started on a new full scale stone church on the same site. The    iron    structure    was    dismantled    and    sent    to    Devon    where    it    was    re-erected    in    Teignmouth.    One remaining   window   from   this   church   has   been   incorporated   in   the   St   John's   you   see   today.   Services   were held    in    the    adjacent    school    and    the    Town    Hall.    Lady    Oglander,    of    Nunwell    House,    Brading,    laid    the foundation stone for the new church on 26 September 1878. The   church   was   built   in   Isle   of   Wight   and   Portland   stone,   able   to   seat   700   people   and   cost   £7,000   to   build   - which   was   considered   remarkably   good   value.   It   was   a   considerable   act   of   faith   to   do   this   as   all   the   money had   to   be   raised   locally.   Rev   Karney   was   an   inspiration   and   under   his   energetic   leadership   funds   came   in. (You   might   be   interested   to   know   that   Lewis   Carroll   once   played   with   the   Karney   children   at   Sandown). When   Rev   Karney   left   the   parish   in   1881,   before   the   work   of   the   new   church   was   completed,   he   donated the £1200 which was raised as a testimonial to him by the town to the Church Completion Fund. You   will   find   a   marble   tablet   in   a   wall   at   the   west   end   of   the   Church   which   is   dedicated   to   this   gift.   This contribution   left   only   £659   to   pay   of   which   £276   was   for   the   architect’s   commission   but   a   collection   made at the opening service wiped another £123 from this debt.
The History of St John the Evangelist and Guide
This    service    took    place    on    Thursday,    2    June    1881    and    saw,    for    the    first    time,    a    large    congregation worshipping   in   the   Parish   Church   of   St   John   the   Evangelist.   Rev   Karney,   making   a   return   visit,   was   the preacher though the service was opened by the new Vicar - Rev William Townsend Storrs. St   John's   is   built   in   the   Early   English   style   with   stone   from   nearby   St   Boniface   quarries   and   roofed   with tiles.   London   architect   B   S   Luck   had   given   the   nave   eight   massive   Portland   stone   columns   with   moulded caps   from   which   sprang   five   graceful   arches   with   clerestory   above.   The   112ft   long   by   30ft   wide   church   was without   a   conventional   spire   but   the   60ft   high   roof   was   topped   by   a   turret   terminating   in   a   finial   100ft from the ground. The church had been well built by a local builder, Issac Barton of Ryde. Nearly   127   years   on,   in   spite   of   several   additions   and   extensions,   the   church   has   retained   its   essential simplicity   and   charm.   It   has   a   wide   brick   interior,   a   short   Chancel   and   narrow   aisles.   The   pews   and woodwork   are   plain   but   not   unattractive.   An   authority   on   architecture   has   said   that   if   St   John’s   possessed an Apse, it could well be described as a Basilica in Gothic style. The   interior   is   very   light   and   spacious   with   many   windows   with   most   lower   windows   having   stained   glass which   is   worthy   of   the   closest   attention.   The   craftsman   is   a   source   of   some   perplexity   but   the   windows were   described   by   the   poet   John   Betjeman   as   “a   rarity   and   the   colouring   quite   magnificent”.   The   choir stalls   are   in   the   nave   so   that   the   bareness   of   the   elevated   chancel   sets   a   stage   for   the   superb   east windows   of   double   tiered   trefoiled   lancets,   all   depicting   scenes   from   the   life   of   Christ.   The   three   larger lights   show   the   Holy   Family,   the   Crucifixion   and   the   Resurrection   -   notice   the   skilfully   graduated   colour   on the   angels’   wings.   Another   fine   window,   in   the   north   wall,   shows   similar   use   of   colour   in   the   wings   of   the angels   in   the   side   lights.   There   are   more   beautiful   windows   on   the   south   wall,   the   central   one   in   memory of   Hilda   -   daughter   of   the   Rev   Canon   Whitby   (Vicar   1891-1905)   and   depicts   Mary   and   Martha   at   Bethany with   a   central   figure   of   Christ   in   a   robe   of   vibrant   red   -   of   such   lustre   that   in   daylight   a   three   dimensional effect   is   achieved.   More   imaginative   use   of   colour   can   be   seen   in   the   window   to   the   left,   a   memorial   to   a young 21 year old soldier who died whilst serving in the Transvaal War in 1901.
The   church’s   rectangular   design   allows   the   chancel   and   side   chapels   to   extend   across   the   full   width   of   the building,   the   latter   divided   from   the   former   with   carved   wooden   screens   in   gothic   style   -   a   design   repeated in   the   clerics’   stalls   and   the   altar   reredos,   where   is   frames   a   painting   of   The   Last   Supper.   The   Lady   Chapel screen   serves   as   a   memorial   to   those   who   died   in   The   Great   War.   Behind   the   Chapel’s   altar   is   an   interesting contemporary   needlework   panel   by   Freda   Copley   of   Leeds.   On   a   blue   batik   background   embroidered forms   reflect   ideas   of   the   origins   of   life   and   the   creation   as   described   in   the   opening   verses   of   St   John’s Gospel. The   Father   Willis   organ,   built   in   Winchester,   was   first   installed   in   1883   and   was   moved   from   the   North   side of the Chancel to its present post in 1966 when the West Porch was built. The    Church    Annexe    was    opened    in    1966    which    added    rooms    and    a    kitchen    to    the    church    facilities. Nowadays   this   is   used   by   a   number   of   organisations   for   a   host   of   activities   including   a   playgroup,   various clubs,   drama   rehearsals,   fund   raising   jumble   sales,   coffee   mornings   etc.   In   February   2004   the   Beverley Community Hall was opened giving additional space for use by St John’s and other organisations. St   John’s   is   very   much   part   of   the   local   community,   a   centre   for   pastoral   work   which,   through   its   active Parish   Church   Council,   Priest-in-Charge,   Assistant   Curate   and   congregation,   encompasses   all   ages.   The various   clubs   and   guilds   which   use   the   Annexe   and   the   Beverley   Community   Hall,   the   participation   of   the present   Priest-in-Charge   (the   Revd   Jonathan   Hall)   on   the   governing   bodies   of   the   two   local   Church   schools, and   the   many   activities   which   have   the   church   as   a   focus   all   point   to   a   continuing   need   for   St   John’s   as   one of Sandown’s active churches. A   final   thought   -   this   building   must   have   been   very   cold   in   winter   before   the   heating   was   installed   and   on the   west   wall   can   be   seen   a   plaque,   placed   by   the   Vicar   and   churchwardens,   recording   the   work   done between   1907-1912,   when   the   chancel   was   redecorated   and   the   glorious   east   windows   installed.         But significantly the first item "in thankful record of the reheating   ……….."
Sandown Isle of Wight St. John the Evangelist

| ©2018 St. John the Evangelist, Sandown

The History of St John the Evangelist and Guide
Over   a   hundred   and   twenty   years   ago   an iron   church   stood   on   this   site   surrounded by    fields    and    farmland,    overlooking    a much     smaller     town     than     Sandown     is today.   It   was   erected   when   Christ   Church -   at   the   other   end   of   town   -   proved   too small   for   the   number   of   people   wanting to    go    to    church.    Eventually    this    iron church   was   not   large   enough   and   largely on   the   initiative   of   the   Vicar   at   that   time (the    Rev    Gilbert    St    Karney)    work    was started   on   a   new   full   scale   stone   church on the same site. The    iron    structure    was    dismantled    and sent   to   Devon   where   it   was   re-erected   in Teignmouth.   One   remaining   window   from this   church   has   been   incorporated   in   the St    John's    you    see    today.    Services    were held   in   the   adjacent   school   and   the   Town Hall.    Lady    Oglander,    of    Nunwell    House, Brading,   laid   the   foundation   stone   for   the new church on 26 September 1878. The   church   was   built   in   Isle   of   Wight   and Portland   stone,   able   to   seat   700   people and    cost    £7,000    to    build    -    which    was considered   remarkably   good   value.   It   was a   considerable   act   of   faith   to   do   this   as   all the   money   had   to   be   raised   locally.   Rev Karney   was   an   inspiration   and   under   his energetic   leadership   funds   came   in.   (You might   be   interested   to   know   that   Lewis Carroll     once     played     with     the     Karney children   at   Sandown).   When   Rev   Karney left   the   parish   in   1881,   before   the   work   of the     new     church     was     completed,     he donated   the   £1200   which   was   raised   as   a testimonial    to    him    by    the    town    to    the Church Completion Fund. You   will   find   a   marble   tablet   in   a   wall   at the    west    end    of    the    Church    which    is dedicated    to    this    gift.    This    contribution left   only   £659   to   pay   of   which   £276   was for     the     architect’s     commission     but     a collection    made    at    the    opening    service wiped another £123 from this debt.
This    service    took    place    on    Thursday,    2 June   1881   and   saw,   for   the   first   time,   a large    congregation    worshipping    in    the Parish   Church   of   St   John   the   Evangelist. Rev   Karney,   making   a   return   visit,   was   the preacher   though   the   service   was   opened by   the   new   Vicar   -   Rev   William   Townsend Storrs. St   John's   is   built   in   the   Early   English   style with     stone     from     nearby     St     Boniface quarries    and    roofed    with    tiles.    London architect    B    S    Luck    had    given    the    nave eight    massive    Portland    stone    columns with    moulded    caps    from    which    sprang five   graceful   arches   with   clerestory   above. The   112ft   long   by   30ft   wide   church   was without   a   conventional   spire   but   the   60ft high     roof     was     topped     by     a     turret terminating    in    a    finial    100ft    from    the ground.   The   church   had   been   well   built by a local builder, Issac Barton of Ryde. Nearly   127   years   on,   in   spite   of   several additions   and   extensions,   the   church   has retained      its      essential      simplicity      and charm.   It   has   a   wide   brick   interior,   a   short Chancel   and   narrow   aisles.   The   pews   and woodwork   are   plain   but   not   unattractive. An   authority   on   architecture   has   said   that if   St   John’s   possessed   an   Apse,   it   could well   be   described   as   a   Basilica   in   Gothic style. The    interior    is    very    light    and    spacious with    many    windows    with    most    lower windows    having    stained    glass    which    is worthy     of     the     closest     attention.     The craftsman   is   a   source   of   some   perplexity but   the   windows   were   described   by   the poet   John   Betjeman   as   “a   rarity   and   the colouring    quite    magnificent”.    The    choir stalls   are   in   the   nave   so   that   the   bareness of   the   elevated   chancel   sets   a   stage   for the   superb   east   windows   of   double   tiered trefoiled     lancets,     all     depicting     scenes from   the   life   of   Christ.   The   three   larger lights      show      the      Holy      Family,      the Crucifixion   and   the   Resurrection   -   notice the     skilfully     graduated     colour     on     the angels’   wings.   Another   fine   window,   in   the north   wall,   shows   similar   use   of   colour   in the   wings   of   the   angels   in   the   side   lights. There   are   more   beautiful   windows   on   the south   wall,   the   central   one   in   memory   of Hilda   -   daughter   of   the   Rev   Canon   Whitby (Vicar   1891-1905)   and   depicts   Mary   and Martha   at   Bethany   with   a   central   figure   of Christ   in   a   robe   of   vibrant   red   -   of   such lustre   that   in   daylight   a   three   dimensional effect   is   achieved.   More   imaginative   use of   colour   can   be   seen   in   the   window   to the   left,   a   memorial   to   a   young   21   year old   soldier   who   died   whilst   serving   in   the Transvaal War in 1901.
The    church’s    rectangular    design    allows the   chancel   and   side   chapels   to   extend across   the   full   width   of   the   building,   the latter     divided     from     the     former     with carved   wooden   screens   in   gothic   style   -   a design   repeated   in   the   clerics’   stalls   and the    altar    reredos,    where    is    frames    a painting    of    The    Last    Supper.    The    Lady Chapel    screen    serves    as    a    memorial    to those   who   died   in   The   Great   War.   Behind the     Chapel’s     altar     is     an     interesting contemporary   needlework   panel   by   Freda Copley     of     Leeds.     On     a     blue     batik background    embroidered    forms    reflect ideas     of     the     origins     of     life     and     the creation    as    described    in    the    opening verses of St John’s Gospel. The      Father      Willis      organ,      built      in Winchester,    was    first    installed    in    1883 and   was   moved   from   the   North   side   of the   Chancel   to   its   present   post   in   1966 when the West Porch was built. The   Church   Annexe   was   opened   in   1966 which   added   rooms   and   a   kitchen   to   the church   facilities.   Nowadays   this   is   used   by a   number   of   organisations   for   a   host   of activities    including    a    playgroup,    various clubs,     drama     rehearsals,     fund     raising jumble    sales,    coffee    mornings    etc.    In February    2004    the    Beverley    Community Hall   was   opened   giving   additional   space for      use      by      St      John’s      and      other organisations. St   John’s   is   very   much   part   of   the   local community,    a    centre    for    pastoral    work which,    through    its    active    Parish    Church Council,   Priest-in-Charge,   Assistant   Curate and   congregation,   encompasses   all   ages. The   various   clubs   and   guilds   which   use the   Annexe   and   the   Beverley   Community Hall,     the     participation     of     the     present Priest-in-Charge   (the   Revd   Jonathan   Hall) on   the   governing   bodies   of   the   two   local Church   schools,   and   the   many   activities which   have   the   church   as   a   focus   all   point to   a   continuing   need   for   St   John’s   as   one of Sandown’s active churches. A   final   thought   -   this   building   must   have been     very     cold     in     winter     before     the heating    was    installed    and    on    the    west wall   can   be   seen   a   plaque,   placed   by   the Vicar   and   churchwardens,   recording   the work   done   between   1907-1912,   when   the chancel   was   redecorated   and   the   glorious east   windows   installed.         But   significantly the first item "in thankful record of the reheating   ……….."

| ©2018 St. John the Evangelist, Sandown

Over    a    hundred    and    twenty    years    ago    an    iron    church    stood    on    this    site surrounded   by   fields   and   farmland,   overlooking   a   much   smaller   town   than Sandown   is   today.   It   was   erected   when   Christ   Church   -   at   the   other   end   of town   -   proved   too   small   for   the   number   of   people   wanting   to   go   to   church. Eventually   this   iron   church   was   not   large   enough   and   largely   on   the   initiative   of the   Vicar   at   that   time   (the   Rev   Gilbert   St   Karney)   work   was   started   on   a   new   full scale stone church on the same site. The   iron   structure   was   dismantled   and   sent   to   Devon   where   it   was   re-erected in     Teignmouth.     One     remaining     window     from     this     church     has     been incorporated   in   the   St   John's   you   see   today.   Services   were   held   in   the   adjacent school   and   the   Town   Hall.   Lady   Oglander,   of   Nunwell   House,   Brading,   laid   the foundation stone for the new church on 26 September 1878. The   church   was   built   in   Isle   of   Wight   and   Portland   stone,   able   to   seat   700 people   and   cost   £7,000   to   build   -   which   was   considered   remarkably   good value.   It   was   a   considerable   act   of   faith   to   do   this   as   all   the   money   had   to   be raised    locally.    Rev    Karney    was    an    inspiration    and    under    his    energetic leadership   funds   came   in.   (You   might   be   interested   to   know   that   Lewis   Carroll once   played   with   the   Karney   children   at   Sandown).   When   Rev   Karney   left   the parish   in   1881,   before   the   work   of   the   new   church   was   completed,   he   donated the   £1200   which   was   raised   as   a   testimonial   to   him   by   the   town   to   the   Church Completion Fund. You   will   find   a   marble   tablet   in   a   wall   at   the   west   end   of   the   Church   which   is dedicated   to   this   gift.   This   contribution   left   only   £659   to   pay   of   which   £276   was for   the   architect’s   commission   but   a   collection   made   at   the   opening   service wiped another £123 from this debt.
The History of St John the Evangelist and Guide
This   service   took   place   on   Thursday,   2   June   1881   and   saw,   for   the   first   time,   a large   congregation   worshipping   in   the   Parish   Church   of   St   John   the   Evangelist. Rev   Karney,   making   a   return   visit,   was   the   preacher   though   the   service   was opened by the new Vicar - Rev William Townsend Storrs. St   John's   is   built   in   the   Early   English   style   with   stone   from   nearby   St   Boniface quarries   and   roofed   with   tiles.   London   architect   B   S   Luck   had   given   the   nave eight   massive   Portland   stone   columns   with   moulded   caps   from   which   sprang five   graceful   arches   with   clerestory   above.   The   112ft   long   by   30ft   wide   church was   without   a   conventional   spire   but   the   60ft   high   roof   was   topped   by   a   turret terminating   in   a   finial   100ft   from   the   ground.   The   church   had   been   well   built by a local builder, Issac Barton of Ryde. Nearly   127   years   on,   in   spite   of   several   additions   and   extensions,   the   church has   retained   its   essential   simplicity   and   charm.   It   has   a   wide   brick   interior,   a short   Chancel   and   narrow   aisles.   The   pews   and   woodwork   are   plain   but   not unattractive.   An   authority   on   architecture   has   said   that   if   St   John’s   possessed an Apse, it could well be described as a Basilica in Gothic style. The   interior   is   very   light   and   spacious   with   many   windows   with   most   lower windows   having   stained   glass   which   is   worthy   of   the   closest   attention.   The craftsman   is   a   source   of   some   perplexity   but   the   windows   were   described   by the   poet   John   Betjeman   as   “a   rarity   and   the   colouring   quite   magnificent”.   The choir   stalls   are   in   the   nave   so   that   the   bareness   of   the   elevated   chancel   sets   a stage    for    the    superb    east    windows    of    double    tiered    trefoiled    lancets,    all depicting   scenes   from   the   life   of   Christ.   The   three   larger   lights   show   the   Holy Family,   the   Crucifixion   and   the   Resurrection   -   notice   the   skilfully   graduated colour   on   the   angels’   wings.   Another   fine   window,   in   the   north   wall,   shows similar   use   of   colour   in   the   wings   of   the   angels   in   the   side   lights.   There   are more   beautiful   windows   on   the   south   wall,   the   central   one   in   memory   of   Hilda -   daughter   of   the   Rev   Canon   Whitby   (Vicar   1891-1905)   and   depicts   Mary   and Martha   at   Bethany   with   a   central   figure   of   Christ   in   a   robe   of   vibrant   red   -   of such    lustre    that    in    daylight    a    three    dimensional    effect    is    achieved.    More imaginative   use   of   colour   can   be   seen   in   the   window   to   the   left,   a   memorial   to a   young   21   year   old   soldier   who   died   whilst   serving   in   the   Transvaal   War   in 1901.
The   church’s   rectangular   design   allows   the   chancel   and   side   chapels   to   extend across   the   full   width   of   the   building,   the   latter   divided   from   the   former   with carved   wooden   screens   in   gothic   style   -   a   design   repeated   in   the   clerics’   stalls and   the   altar   reredos,   where   is   frames   a   painting   of   The   Last   Supper.   The   Lady Chapel   screen   serves   as   a   memorial   to   those   who   died   in   The   Great   War. Behind   the   Chapel’s   altar   is   an   interesting   contemporary   needlework   panel   by Freda   Copley   of   Leeds.   On   a   blue   batik   background   embroidered   forms   reflect ideas   of   the   origins   of   life   and   the   creation   as   described   in   the   opening   verses of St John’s Gospel. The   Father   Willis   organ,   built   in   Winchester,   was   first   installed   in   1883   and   was moved   from   the   North   side   of   the   Chancel   to   its   present   post   in   1966   when   the West Porch was built. The   Church   Annexe   was   opened   in   1966   which   added   rooms   and   a   kitchen   to the   church   facilities.   Nowadays   this   is   used   by   a   number   of   organisations   for   a host   of   activities   including   a   playgroup,   various   clubs,   drama   rehearsals,   fund raising    jumble    sales,    coffee    mornings    etc.    In    February    2004    the    Beverley Community   Hall   was   opened   giving   additional   space   for   use   by   St   John’s   and other organisations. St   John’s   is   very   much   part   of   the   local   community,   a   centre   for   pastoral   work which,    through    its    active    Parish    Church    Council,    Priest-in-Charge,    Assistant Curate   and   congregation,   encompasses   all   ages.   The   various   clubs   and   guilds which   use   the   Annexe   and   the   Beverley   Community   Hall,   the   participation   of the   present   Priest-in-Charge   (the   Revd   Jonathan   Hall)   on   the   governing   bodies of   the   two   local   Church   schools,   and   the   many   activities   which   have   the   church as   a   focus   all   point   to   a   continuing   need   for   St   John’s   as   one   of   Sandown’s active churches. A   final   thought   -   this   building   must   have   been   very   cold   in   winter   before   the heating   was   installed   and   on   the   west   wall   can   be   seen   a   plaque,   placed   by   the Vicar   and   churchwardens,   recording   the   work   done   between   1907-1912,   when the   chancel   was   redecorated   and   the   glorious   east   windows   installed.         But significantly the first item "in thankful record of the reheating   ……….."
Sandown Isle of Wight St. John the Evangelist
Sandown Isle of Wight St. John the Evangelist